Coming right along…

The magazine is coming along great. I am pretty happy with the layout and the content.

August 2020-Cover
Click on the image to get a preview of the magazine

 

 

 


I find the best thing about having social distance is the opportunity to take more courses offered from the Florida Masters Naturalist Program. These locations are scattered throughout the state and when you want to take a course, you would have to travel a lot! It’s like spending more money on travel expenses than the cost of the program itself.

But now with the online programs, it has afforded me to take more courses and to get closer to obtaining my certificate!

The programs I am currently taking are

  • Environmental Interpretation
  • Freshwater Systems
  • Wildlife Monitoring
  • Coastal Restoration

It’s going to be a lot of work but it will give me more confidence to move forward as well as gaining an educational background for any future job opportunities.


Be safe!

 

Anticipated Date

It was the Crab Spider

For weeks I have been pondering about what to do and I think a lot of us have right now. Concerned, stressed, worried about what’s happening next.
There are those that are fortunate to still have a steady income through all this COVID-19 situation, as those self-employed like me income has dropped dramatically and that creates a hardship.
So what are you going to do? You are going to stay strong, move forward, and make things happen.
The place where I feel at peace, relaxed, and sort out life directions is in nature, and 99% percent of the time I get the answers that I need.
My husband and I strongly agree that if you stand amongst the trees a sense of wisdom will come upon you. It may not happen for many people. It’s hard to explain and it takes a long time to build that inner connection.
A couple of days ago, I stood in a section of longleaf pines and closed my eyes. What came to me was that everything was going to be okay. To just follow your path and things will work out. I told my husband about this and we both had tears fill our eyes.
Yesterday on my photographic adventure I happen to catch a glimpse of a crab spider on a flower. I observed that spider, asking what they heck is it doing, why is it doing that.
This spider created a canopy using the petals of a Tickseed. It attached its spider silk to one petal and then pull it to connect to another petal to create a cover. Now, it’s out of the sun in a petal canopy awaiting for a butterfly or bee to gather nectar. How fricken smart is that!
While being totally astonished by this, I was thinking about how many people don’t know this? How many people actually seen this happen? I need to show people this, tell people about this.
The final decision to move forward with my Florida Nature magazine was made by an arthropod, the crab spider.
I know I am not an award-winning writer or have a degree in journalism or biology, it is my passion for nature, my creative ideas, and the drive to learn more.

I hope many people will enjoy this adventure.

 


I have been working on the layout and content for the online magazine publication for the past couple of weeks. After a few layout modifications and content changes… I think I have a good start.

There is still a lot to work left to go. Hopefully, I will be able to get some extra freelance work that will help with some starting up expenses.

August 2020-Cover

As this publication is only available online, I am able to embed my video presentations and that makes this magazine even more interesting!

I will continue to post more information about the magazine when available.

Thank you to all the followers!


For this first issue in August, I will be offering free advertising pages for selected Florida outdoor, nature, and/or wildlife businesses and/or organizations.

  • 2 spots for a two-paged spread
  • 8 spots for a one-paged
  • 8 spots for business cards

For more information and if you qualify please contact Alice Mary Herden at alice@green-flymedia.com


Stay Safe!

 

Eastern Meadowlark

While it was a failed attempt to find a particular bird I was fortunate enough to have photographed an Eastern Meadowlark.

Meadowlark
Eastern Meadowlark | Alice Mary Herden | May 2020

Such a vibrant yellow chest with their distinguished black v-shaped mark. You may be able to view a couple of the Eastern Meadowlarks perched on fence posts overlooking open fields. Upon my observation, it seems they like to perch on cattle dung mounds as well.

 

Meadowlark 4
Eastern Meadowlark | Alice Mary Herden | April 2020

 

Click on any of the photos to view the video. Unfortunately, it was a very windy day so there is no sound. I will upload a new video with sound when I can!


Links:

https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/eastern-meadowlark

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Meadowlark

 

Green Heron

Another very patient wading bird, the Green Heron. I actually timed this one. Just a couple of blinks, this bird stood still for over 3 minutes. That’s a long time, but I think the Great Blue Heron beats him in the stand like a statue competition.

Green Heron-print-web
Green Heron | Alice Mary Herden | April 2020

Click on the image to view the video.


Links:

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/lifehistory

https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/green-heron

 

Summer Tanager

I headed out yesterday determined to get more macro shots focusing on some specific insects and plant species, and well that didn’t happen.

While hiking all I was hearing was the peaceful sounds of nature and birds… birds everywhere. I realized this day is not going to be a macro day, it was going to be a birding day. I trekked back to the car to get my other lens and tripod. I found a great spot and I set up camp.

Summer Tanager-small
Summer Tanager | Alice Mary Herden | April 2020

Sometimes things are not always the way you plan, and that is exactly how nature is. Nature will give you all the photo opportunities only if you listen and be patient.

That morning, I headed out just before the sun rose to my favorite place. It was a weird feeling. It was like Chassahowitzka was telling me that it was not a good day to be there. (I hope other photographers know what I mean) So I respected that feeling and traveled to another location and in return, I had the best birding day ever!


Links:

https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/summer-tanager

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Summer_Tanager/lifehistory


Stay Safe!

 

The Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge

Sometimes you just have to wait a half a year to go back to places you visited before, especially at different times of the seasons.

It was a very long day, and a very long drive but worth every minute!

Click on image to view my very small video coverage of the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge!

The Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge-pic_small


Be safe and always respect the natural space of wildlife.